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Community Outreach Options

Each year on October 2nd, activists around the world call for an end to animal agriculture by holding protests, candlelight vigils, information tables, documentary screenings and more in commemoration of World Day for Farmed Animals. Will you bring the message of compassion to your community?

 

Leafleting

Leafleting is probably the simplest form of outreach, requiring no permits, prior arrangements, or equipment. Target high-traffic areas at busy times, like lunch in downtown business district or closing time at a major event.

Here are some helpful hints:

  • WDFALeaflet» Put up a sign or banner in front of you, so people will have an idea of what you're about and reduce the number of leaflets trashed

  • » Extend your arm with leaflet in front of people, so they can't miss it

  • » Have a friendly smile and say something germane, like "Help the animals?"

  • » Do not react to unfriendly comments

  • » People tend to follow the example of those in front of them, so you may want to become a bit more assertive, when a streak of acceptance stops

  • » Move around, so it will look like you're handing out stuff, even when you're not

FARM's “Have We Been Lied To?” booklets are particularly appropriate for this observance, but nearly any literature noting the devastating impacts of animal agriculture on animal welfare, human health, and climate change will do.

Information Table

This form of outreach requires an interested audience, perhaps as part of a community event, as well as a permit or fee, a table, and attractive banners, food samples, or other means of attracting people.

Demonstrations - Vigils

VGL Perdue 08

It helps to select a symbolic spot, like a butcher shop or USDA office, or just busy commuter routes during rush hour.

You only need a half dozen people with signs and message T-shirts to attract attention. One person should be available to leaflet and talk to passersby and media. Content and volume of chanting should fit occasion.

A permit from local authorities is required only if demonstrators pose a significant obstruction to pedestrian traffic.

 

Demonstrations - Marches

WDFAmarch

You need to pick a symbolic ending point - perhaps a butcher shop or an USDA office.

You need at least 15-20 people with message T-shirts, signs, and symbolic devices like coffins (black cardboard), cages, and chains to attract attention. Spreading out makes the event look bigger.  One person should be available to leaflet and talk to passersby and media. Content and volume of chanting should fit occasion.

A permit from local authorities is required only if marchers pose a significant obstruction to pedestrian traffic or spill onto the roadway.

Demonstrations - Street Theater

WDFAcage 
 STH Tel Aviv 05

These are dramatic re-enactments of what the animals go through. Need an open area with lots of pedestrian traffic and a permit from local authorities.

Here are some examples from past years:

Cage-in - several people with minimal clothing packed in a large simulated battery cage for 10 minutes at a time, while others hold signs explaining the scene.

Slaughterhouse  - a half dozen people in minimal clothing on their hands and knees, prodded by others wearing aprons daubed with red dye, crawling to the "butcher" with "bloody" apron, who then proceeds to "slaughter" them in turn with a make-believe knife, while others hold signs explaining the scene.

Die-in - a dozen or more people, preferably dressed in black, lying motionless in typical crime victim poses, for 15 minutes at a time, while others hold signs explaining the scene.

Meat packages - 2-5 nearly naked people daubed with red paint lying motionless in large open cardboard containers covered with Saran wrap, simulating meat packages,  for 15 minutes at a time, while others hold signs explaining the scene.


Banner Drops

Banners with a brief message may be displayed from roofs of buildings, overpasses, or other high structures. They convey a sense of authority. Safety should be a paramount consideration. Banners in overpasses should be placed inside the protective fencing, so they can not fall in the roadway and cause an accident. Banners have a short life span, so they should be placed at optimal viewing times.

BNRDC9Here are some appropriate messages:

World Day for Farmed Animals

Respect animals - Don't eat them!

Stop the killing! Eat your veggies.

Media

All three types of demonstrations deserve ample promotion on social media and competent news releases to traditional media. A news release should begin by providing a couple of phone contacts, then answer the questions of what? when? where? and why?, and conclude with a brief account of details. It should be sent to the news and community editors of each local newspaper and TV station, 3-4 days before the event, preferably with an email or phone follow-up on the day before.

For any questions, feel free to contact us at info@DayForAnimals.org.